Tag Archives: Door County

Hoping for Bats: Installing a Bat House

I have a love/hate relationship with bats. I find them a bit creepy because they carry rabies and who isn’t scared by these nocturnal flying mammals, but I also know they are vital in keeping night flying insects like mosquitoes in check.

By Marvin Moriarty/USFWS – This image originates from the National Digital Library of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8126465

 

For now, I’ll take my chances with the rabies and opt for helping our local WI bats survive by putting up a bat house. Bats are under attack from loss of habitat and the fungus causing white-nosed syndrome. In nesting areas that white-nosed syndrome has spread, 30-100% of bats have been wiped out. This has been, and still is, catastrophic to the species.

 

 

 

 

One way to help the species is to conserve existing bat habitats and provide new ones.

Bat House in Peninsula State Park, WI

When I was out at my local Wild Bird Unlimited store I happened upon bat houses for sale. How could I pass it up for our cabin in Door County, WI?

Since we are in a northern climate, it helps to paint the house black to retain heat. Using black spray paint, Steve made quick work of painting the house black.

It was so beautifully made (in the USA btw), we had to leave some if it unpainted.

Now came time to install.  Ideally the house is placed in a southern facing direction on a tall pole with no obstructions underneath or directly in front of it and at least 15 feet up. Originally I thought the best location for the house was on a utility pole along the driveway, but I realized that really wasn’t a great idea. If we ever needed a service call during nesting season, I don’t think I’ll find a repairman who’ll go up that pole! Installing a freestanding pole, tall and strong enough, is also not in our DIY repertoire.

So, while not ideal, we settled on a tree that was in a pretty open area and faced south. This became a family event with my husband and boys all pitching in to get this installed.

The house comes with a screw eye for easy hanging.  We bought a large hook, screwed it into the tree and hung the house.  To keep it from swinging, we also added a couple of screws at the bottom to secure it to the tree.

Now we’ll wait for the bats to find it. Generally takes a little longer for them to find it in a tree, but I’ve seen them in the area at dusk so I’m hopeful.

Do you have a bat habitat near you, or have a bat house? If you do, have you noticed a decline?

Any good bat stories? I’ll always remember the bat in my college attic apartment!

Since we didn’t hang the bat house on the utility pole, it became the perfect place for hanging a beautiful bluebird house handmade by my mom, Peggy.

Bat Resources:

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Audubon Bat Shelter Model NABAT


New From: $30.03 USD In Stock

Chickadees Are Back in the Nestbox

While I was hoping for bluebirds this year in the nest boxes, this little chickadee popped her head out and seems to be making it her home for the spring. Luckily Steve had his camera handy and could get some pictures of this cute little bird.

She was just so entertaining to watch. It was like she couldn’t believe her good fortune in finding this amazing nesting spot.

When we came back a couple of weeks later I was happy to see that they were actually moving in.

This is a very typical chickadee nest. A base of moss and then softer material like rabbit fur for the top layer. Check out my blog post from last year that followed nesting chickadees in Who’s in my Nestboxes and Checking on the Bird’s Nests.

The Eastern Phoebe couple is also back nesting on the front porch!

Woodlink Wooden Bluebird House – Model BB1


New From: $20.95 USD In Stock

Hummingbirds and Monarchs

While I’ve planted a lot of flowers and plants that attract pollinators like hummingbirds and butterflies at home, my WI garden is much more natural, but equally full of attractive plants.

IMG_6098 (1)

This wild columbine at the woods’ edge is a natural attractant, while other native and cultivated flowering plants can be found in the garden.

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Continue reading

What’s In My Door County Garden?

As a gardener, one of the fun things about our new cabin in Door County WI is seeing what is going to come up in the gardens this spring and summer.  I love taking a walk around the property to see what’s changed since the last time we were there.  I know the previous owner took pride in her gardens, but since we bought the place in the fall much was already passed its prime.  So this spring has been a wonderful surprise to me!

peony

Much to my delight, there are so many interesting and colorful plants all around the house.  Some in gardens, some hiding the rural necessities and some enhancing the “yard”.

Up front, we’re welcomed by a beautiful display of peonies, irises and ferns.

IMG_5696

IMG_5692 (1)

IMG_6396 (1)

Iris reticulata “Springtime”

And all around the front step are these gorgeous, unusually colored columbine.  A favorite of the hummingbirds and bees.

Purple Columbine

There’s hostas nearby as well, but the deer are finding them to be pretty tasty.

deer damage to hostas

Luckily they don’t seem to like the Dragon’s Blood Stonecrop (Spurium Dragon’s Blood) or rug junipers.  These are great ground covers and seem to be flourishing with minimal care.

Dragon's Blood Stonecrop

In a bit of a low area, there’s a rock garden that provides a brilliant splash of purple and green.

IMG_6279

It’s a relatively natural property, so I’m taking delight in the daisies in the grass.  Since the grass is rather sparse, I glad something pretty is in its place.

IMG_5697 (1)

It’s going to be a little tough to mow around, but we’ll figure something out.

Based on the plant records she left me, I know there’s going to be lots more in bloom next time we’re there!

Spring Leeks (aka Ramps)

This past spring while wandering my Door County, Wisconsin woods, the ground was covered with beautiful, light green leaves.

Wild Leeks

I knew it wasn’t trout lilies, since the leaves weren’t mottled, but I also knew it looked familiar.  Without a flower, I wasn’t sure what this plentiful plant was.  I sent a photo to my expert and she instantly answered “Leeks”!   My mom went on to remind me when I was a kid, we had people who would pull off the road near our cabin in Western NY and scramble around in the woods harvesting them.  I knew I had seen them before.

Wild Leeks

I did a little more research and realized I had a little foodie gold mine back there in the woods.  Wild Leeks, or Ramps,  (Allium tricoccum) have a sharp flavor, similar to an onion or garlic and come into season in the early spring.  You can recognize them by their smooth green leaves that emerge from the ground, with a hint of purple on the lower stem.

Wild Leeks

You know for sure you have ramps, when you break a leaf and you can distinctively smell onion/garlic.  No smell, no eating!!

I had never used them before, so I harvested just a little to try out in a couple of recipes.  Wild leeks are actually endangered or rare in many areas because of over-harvesting and they are hard to cultivate.  Rule of thumb to maintain a healthy patch is to only pick 5-10% of a patch, or harvest only the leaves.  To harvest, it’s easiest to use a trowel and loosen the dirt to make it easier to pop out the bulb and greens as a one.  Or, just have a clean shears to trim off the leaves and leave the bulbs behind.

Wild Leeks

Once I picked what I thought was enough to try in a couple of recipes, I left the rest alone to grow and be healthy for many years to come.  I also knew I wasn’t going to be able to eat them right away so I chose to freeze them for later use.

To freeze, first clean off the dirt, peel off any slimy outer skins and cut off the root end.

Wild Leeks

Oh, they look so delicious and the house smells so tasty. I then cut off the white bulbs and and put them directly into a freezer bag.  The greens I blanched for 1 minute in boiling water, plunged into ice water and then placed in a separate freezer bag.

blanching wild leeks

Wild Leeks

Once things had settled down a bit, I finally was able to get them out of the freezer to try.  I decided a Wild Leek Risotto was a good place to start.

Wild Leek Risotto

Using a tasty recipe for Wild Ramp Lemon Risotto from DOC  from The Kitchn, I made my first recipe.  Yum, is all I can say.  What a perfect low sodium side dish for some grilled Copper River Salmon.

Wild Leek Risotto

I still have enough for another meal and I have a bunch more risotto options to try. Check out my Pinterest site for some wild leek/ramp ideas.

Have you tried any foraging foods this spring?

BTW, the two things that are easily confused wild leeks are Trout Lily and Lily of the Valley.  Trout Lily have mottled leaves and white or yellow flowers that will appear at the same time and do not smell like onions.  Lily of the Valley are toxic and have two or three leaves on one stem, come up later in the season, and DO NOT SMELL LIKE ONION. As one who is not keen on foraging, I can attest to the fact that wild leeks smell like onions/garlic and lily of the valley do not.  Use that as your guide and all with be fine and delicious.

Now I’m ready to try out my garlic scapes.

Checking On the Bird’s Nests

I was able to get back up to our cabin in Door County sooner than I thought and checked on the Black-capped Chickadees nest in our nest boxes.   In my previous post, Who’s In My Nest Boxes, I discovered that chickadees had laid their eggs in the boxes intended for bluebirds.  In the first box there were 6 eggs and the second 11!  I was a little nervous that the older 6 eggs might be too close to becoming fledglings, but I was pretty confident they were still young enough not to make a too early dash from the nest.  So I took a quick peak.

This was just the epitome of cuteness!  Six little immature chickadees.  Mom and Dad were none too happy, so I quickly let them be and didn’t disturb them again.

Black-capped Chickadee nest

The other nest was not as far along.  They are clearly newly hatched and instinctively looking for food.  There were still some eggs in the nest and I’m not sure those will hatch or not.

Black-capped Chickadee nest

Black-capped Chickadee nest

To give you an idea of just how tiny these hatchlings are, I took a picture from the front of the box to give you some scale.

Black-capped Chickadee nest

I also have two other birds nesting on the house.  Not near the house, but actually on the house.  On the front porch is an Eastern Phoebe nest.  It’s not uncommon for them to nest in this kind of location.  They often nest on eaves or ledges on structures.  I remember when I was a kid, we came to our cabin one weekend and a Phoebe had made her nest right on the door frame and we couldn’t open the door.  We were able to create a shelf for the nest and the mom didn’t seem to mind at all.

Eastern Phoebe nest

Eastern Phoebe nest

To keep off the nuisance birds, the previous owner had put a nail board up. Apparently, the Phoebe didn’t seem to mind.

Eastern Phoebe nest

The parents can always be found nearby.

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Then just recently a Robin has set up house under the elevated back deck.  I discovered it first by walking out on the deck and scaring her off the nest right below my feet.  Scared me too!

Robin nest

Robin nest

Certainly a lot of excitement from the birds!  Do you have any nests you’re watching?

 

Fall Mushrooms in Door County, WI

I was surprised to see so many mushrooms on a recent fall trip to Door County, WI.  I know many varieties grow well into fall, but with the mild El Ninõ winter we seem to be having, many plants including mushrooms are lasting well past their usual growing seasons.  The Coprinus comatus (Shaggy Mane) was the first mushroom that caught my eye.  It was popping right up through the gravel driveway.  

Each morning was this most interesting stalk–

Coprinus comatus (Shaggy Mane)


Coprinus comatus (Shaggy Mane)

But the next morning, each new mushroom looked like this!  Something found them to be very tasty so I never was able to see it grow any further.

Coprinus comatus (Shaggy Mane)

As I walked in the hardwood woods, I came across a surprising number of other mushrooms.  When I later tried to identify these, I realized had nowhere close to enough information to be sure what was what.  At a minimum, these are some field notes that I need to make next time if I hope to make an identification:

  • size of overall mushroom and cap
  • what is the location; note nearby trees; on ground or tree
  • look underneath–gills or no gills; gill description
  • flesh texture (hairy, smooth, woody etc), color, odor
  • stem description

There’s additionally more scientific methods to assist the identification of  mushrooms, but I think these simple observations would have probably allowed me to identify  most of the mushrooms I saw on my walk.

So, in the absence of knowing what I was looking at, here’s the unlabeled photos of the mushrooms I saw.  If you happen to know what these are, I’d love some assistance.

IMG_3635

IMG_3344

IMG_3341

Rozites caperata, Gypsy Mushroom.

Out mushroom hunting in Door County or elsewhere?  Here’s a a few resources I found quite useful:

 

Fall in Door County, Wisconsin

Fall in Door County

In addition to going to Northern Michigan for the weekend (Fall in Northern Michigan/Stumbling Upon Club-Mosses), Steve and I  made a trip up to Door County, Wisconsin the third week of October.  It was definitely peak colors that week and it was spectacular.

The day started like this!  Sunrise over Lake Michigan.

Sunrise in Bailey's Harbor

After breakfast, we started to explore…

Fall in Door County

The forests of Door County are full of hardwoods like Sugar Maple, Beech, Ash, Red Oak, White Oak and Paper Birch.

Fall in Door County

Fall in Door County

Fall in Door County

Fall in Door County

Looking down we were surprised to see these Maidenhair Ferns (Adiantum pedatum). Always a fun find!

Maidenhair fern

Even this late, the raspberry garden is still full of juicy raspberries.

everbearing raspberries

Of course, Daisy is enjoying the fall woods as well!

Westie